UF Artificial Intelligence Research

News from the AI Initiative

Hero image for Explore Summer '21 feature story, "All-Seeing Algorithms"
Artificial intelligence and computer science researchers say getting machines to do the right thing has turned out to be relatively easy. We program Roombas to vacuum our homes, but don’t expect them to brew our coffee. We program robotic arms to sort parts in factories, but not to decide which colors to paint cars. We program doorbells to tell us who is at the door, but not to let them in. Most of our machines do one thing and do it well, usually in error-free fashion. They get the task right.
Hero image for Explore Summer '21 feature story, "Trusting Tech"
When you can’t trust your own eyes and ears to detect deepfakes, who can you trust? Perhaps, a machine. University of Florida researcher Damon Woodard is using artificial intelligence methods to develop algorithms that can detect deepfakes — images, text, video and audio that purports to be real but isn’t. These algorithms, Woodard says, are better at detecting deepfakes than humans.
Hero image for Explore Summer '21 feature story, "Vital Signs"
Azra Bihorac says one of the most important collaborations for doctors and...
Hero image for Explore Summer '21 feature story, "Data Prospecting"
Not so long ago, a scientist might say she could never have too much data. Even today, in a world drowning in data, it is better to be data-rich than data-poor.
On a hot, muggy morning in July 2020, University of Florida President Kent Fuchs announced an astonishing $70 million public-private partnership between UF and NVIDIA, thus making artificial intelligence (AI) the centerpiece of a major, long-term initiative combining world-class research infrastructure, cutting-edge analysis and a revolutionary approach to curriculum.
This summer, five graduate students in the University of Florida Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology (APK), join 10 graduate students in biomedical engineering, neuroscience and clinical psychology to learn about the applications and fundamentals of artificial intelligence (AI), specifically around machine learning.
If you have ever brought home seemingly fresh produce from the grocery store only to find it wilted and moldering a few days later, Tie Liu feels your pain. “Everybody has this problem: Which of these vegetables or fruits should I use first? Guess wrong, and you end up throwing out the food,” said Liu, a postharvest researcher and assistant professor in the UF/IFAS horticultural sciences department.
UF students from any major can now pursue a certificate that teaches them the basics of artificial intelligence, a field likely to uniquely position students for the future workforce.
Artificial intelligence is breaking into the doctor's office, with new models that can transcribe, analyze and even offer predictions based on written notes and conversations between physicians and their patients.